Publishing with CVIR Endovascular: The Author Experience

CVIR Endovascular is CIRSE’s open-access journal, set up to cater for the rising amount of endovascular research and in response to the previous lack of publication possibilities for researchers. It was launched in September 2017, and published its first articles two year ago, in June 2018. Since then more than 120 articles have been published online, with over 53,700 article downloads.


We recently spoke with some authors who have recently published their research in CVIR Endovascular to find out about their experience.

 

Find out what they had to say:

 

Deepsha Agrawal: author of "Awareness and knowledge of interventional radiology among medical students at an Indian institution"

 

Osman Ahmed: author of "Transsplenic portal vein recanalization and direct intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement to optimize liver transplantation"

 

Tajana Turk: author of "Acute kidney injury following percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy of subclavian artery stent graft thrombosis: a case report"

 

Click here to read the interviews from 2019.

 

Deepsha Agrawal

 

Can you tell us a little bit about your paper that was published in CVIR Endovascular?

 

Agrawal: The central theme of my paper was exploring the knowledge and awareness of interventional radiology among medical students. From various studies in the past we understand that interventional radiology (IR) curriculum is underrepresented in undergraduate medical curriculum. Our survey-based study studied this in an Indian university and found students report limited and inconsistent teaching in IR. This is indirectly linked to their poor understanding of the scope of practice in IR.

 

Communication of new technologies and short communications have always been the cornerstone of the growth of interventional radiology. Do you think there are currently enough easily accessible interventional radiology publication possibilities for case reports, short communications, technical notes etc.?


Agrawal: IR being a novel specialty, the scope of practice is increasing everyday. Because this discipline is relatively new it is also very dynamic. There is a lot of new and exciting work happening but unfortunately there are not many journals that publish case reports and short communications. These can be great learning instruments and should find space alongside original research articles.


Open access is the future in scientific publishing. What is your experience with open access? Was your paper in CVIR Endovascular your first open access publication? How did you find the editorial handling experience?


Agrawal: The spirit of research has always been learning and teaching. Open and accessible research aligns perfectly with this and has the greatest impact on learning. There are challenges like competitive disadvantage, however, there is slow yet significant progress in open access publications. My first open access publication with CVIR endovascular was very smooth and I am totally for open access.


Impact factor is still an important scientific parameter in many institutions, although other parameters like citation index are becoming more important. How is this in your institution and what is your opinion about this?


Agrawal: Like I stated previously, the principle underpinning research is learning and teaching. Impact factor and citation index all are objective measures of how a paper stimulates this learning. I believe that publication choice should encompass multiple indices as opposed to a single index like impact factor.

 

Young scientists find it more and more difficult to get their first papers published. Do you think that CVIR Endovascular can play a role in alleviating the situation?

 

Agrawal: CVIR endovascular has a reputation of a fair and open peer review process which makes it a great journal for young scientists hoping to publish their first papers.


Would you consider submitting your scientific work to CVIR Endovascular again and if so, why?


Agrawal: I had a very positive experience with the processing and publication of my last paper with CVIR endovascular. The dissemination of my study among IR colleagues was also very impactful which is something that makes me consider this journal for my future papers.

 

 

 

Deepsha Agrawal

County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, UK

 

 

Title: Awareness and knowledge of interventional radiology among medical students at an Indian institution

 

Article type: Original Article

 

Authors: Deepsha Agrawal, Michael Alan Renfrew, Sulove Singhal and Yash Bhansali

 

 

Read the article here.


Osman Ahmed

 

Can you tell us a little bit about your paper that was published in CVIR Endovascular?

Ahmed: This paper was a “case report” type of submission that described the novelty of combining DIPS with portal vein recanalisation to re-establish portal flow in a patient in consideration for liver transplantation.

Communication of new technologies and short communications have always been the cornerstone of the growth of interventional radiology. Do you think there are currently enough easily accessible interventional radiology publication possibilities for case reports, short communications, technical notes etc.?

Ahmed: I personally feel that there is a greater need for more IR/endovascular related journals that encourage these types of submissions. As alluded to in the question, the strength of IR lies in the innovative nature of the specialty and how even seemingly “minor” case submissions have the potential to push the field forward significantly. As flagship journals like CVIR and JVIR naturally progress to focus on higher quality of evidence studies, this creates less opportunity for these other smaller submissions.  

Open access is the future in scientific publishing. What is your experience with open access? Was your paper in CVIR Endovascular your first open access publication? How did you find the editorial handling experience?

Ahmed: This was my first experience with an open access publication. I found the process with CVIR Endovascular to be very pleasurable and organized. I particularly enjoyed the short turnaround time and the opportunity for application fee waivers for authors (like myself) who did not have funding to support our submission.

Impact factor is still an important scientific parameter in many institutions, although other parameters, like citation index, are becoming more important. How is this in your institution and what is your opinion about this?

Ahmed: I am fortunate that these scientific parameters are not heavily weighted in my institution, which affords me the opportunity to be flexible in my academic endeavours. It is, however, nice to see that there are other citation metrics that are gaining popularity, as there are advantages/disadvantages to all scoring classifications.

Young scientists find it more and more difficult to get their first papers published. Do you think that CVIR Endovascular can play a role in alleviating the situation?

Ahmed: I absolutely think CVIR Endovascular can have a lead role in this scenario, as junior researchers typically have less experience (both research and clinical) to rely on when submitting studies. This may potentially discourage scientists if they focus on journals that are very stringent or have low acceptance rates. Given CVIR Endovascular’s focus and acceptance of smaller case studies and reports, this presents a great opportunity for authors to choose this journal to get their “foot in the door” when it comes to publishing.

Would you consider submitting your scientific work to CVIR Endovascular again and if so, why?

Ahmed: I would definitely consider submitting more work to CVIR Endovascular, and in fact already have. The main reason for this is that this is the ideal journal to display endovascular research to the IR community, given it carries the prestige and reputation of its parent journal, CVIR, with a similar scientific rigor and review. Additionally, the submission process is very smooth and straightforward, which limits formatting delays, along with a relatively quick turnaround time to decision. 

 

 

 

Osman Ahmed

University of Chicago Medical Center, USA

 

 

Title: Transsplenic portal vein recanalization and direct intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement to optimize liver transplantation

 

Article type: Case Report

 

Authors: Osman Ahmed, Abhijit L. Salaskar, Steven Zangan, Anjana Pillai and Talia Baker

 

 

Read the article here.


Tajana Turk

 

Can you tell us a little bit about your paper that was published in CVIR Endovascular?

Turk: With of group of colleagues, I have recently published a case report in CVIR Endovascular. We have presented a patient with subclavian artery aneurysm causing distal embolisation and hand ischemia. The aneurysm was treated with stent graft, but with a subsequent graft thrombosis 3 months later. After graft recanalisation, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy with an AngioJet device was performed which resulted in dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury. To our knowledge, this was the first reported case of dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for peripheral arterial thrombosis.

Communication of new technologies and short communications have always been the cornerstone of the growth of Interventional radiology. Do you think there are currently enough easily accessible Interventional radiology publication possibilities for case reports, short communications, technical notes etc.?

Turk: I think that most interventional radiology publications nowadays focus on original research, big studies and meta-analysis. However, many of us in IR do not have the resources or the opportunity to participate in such studies. Publishing case reports, short communications and technical notes is becoming problematic since many journals tend not to accept them. Yet, I believe that such papers, although of “less importance” can actually be of huge impact in everyday work. Not once have I had a problematic clinical situation for which I had not found a solution in someone else’s published case report or technical note.

Open access is the future in scientific publishing. What is your experience with open access? Was your paper in CVIR Endovascular your first open access publication? How did you find the editorial handling experience?

Turk: More and more papers move toward open access and this indeed is probably the model for publishing in the future. I have used open access service before publishing in CVIR Endovascular, and although the cost is sometimes not negligible, the benefit makes it worth it. Open access journals are mostly online and therefore can accept more articles and provide much faster service. The CVIR Endovascular editorial service makes communication and the publishing process easy with clear instructions and prompt service. What I also like in CVIR Endovascular is the fact that the editorial comments stay visible for all the readers. Reading those can be of huge help for future writing and publishing.

Impact factor is still an important scientific parameter in many institutions, although other parameters like citation index are becoming more important. How is this in your institution and what is your opinion about this?

Turk: My institution uses the h-index as a measure of scholarly significance. Since h-index combines an assessment of both quantity (number of publications) and quality (references to those publications), one must not only have published papers, but that work must also be cited to be counted for the h-index. Since open access journals provide much greater audience for your work, the chances of being cited are also substantially bigger.

Young scientists find it more and more difficult to get their first papers published. Do you think that CVIR Endovascular can play a role in alleviating the situation?

Turk: All young researchers know that the chances for publishing your own work in high IF journals are not favourable. I believe that the best strategy is to aim for open access journals which accept case reports and technical notes and then build your way up. CVIR Endovascular can play a great role in alleviating the situation with its publishing policies. Being a part of CIRSE makes the journal well respected in the IR community.

Would you consider submitting your scientific work to CVIR Endovascular again and if so, why?

Turk: I will definitely submit my future work to CVIR Endovascular again. The user-friendly manuscript submission system, clear and concise instructions for authors, fast response and publication rates as well as open access policy which makes the articles available to the whole IR community, makes CVIR Endovascular a great and obvious choice.

 

Tajana Turk

Faculty of Medicine, J.J.Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek University Hospital, Croatia

 

 

Title: Acute kidney injury following percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy of subclavian artery stent graft thrombosis: a case report

 

Article type: Case Report

 

Authors: Tajana Turk, Darko Blaskovic, Ranko Smiljanic and Vinko Vidjak

 

 

Read the article here.